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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

1 edition of The hessian fly (Mayetiola (Cecidomyia) destructor Say.) found in the catalog.

The hessian fly (Mayetiola (Cecidomyia) destructor Say.)

F. M. Webster

The hessian fly (Mayetiola (Cecidomyia) destructor Say.)

by F. M. Webster

  • 354 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hessian fly,
  • Wheat,
  • Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    StatementF. M. Webster
    SeriesCircular / U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. Bureau of Entomology -- no. 70, Circular (United States. Bureau of Entomology) -- no. 70.
    ContributionsUnited States. Bureau of Entomology, United States. Dept. of Agriculture
    The Physical Object
    Pagination16 p. :
    Number of Pages16
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25511227M
    LC Control Number06000586
    OCLC/WorldCa810931543

    At present the Hessian fly is also found in Canada, Europe, northern Africa, western Asia, and New Zealand. Two or occasionally three generations of Hessian flies appear yearly. The adult, which first appears in spring, is about mm (about in) long and dark brown to black, with long, beaded antennae and sparsely veined wings. of Hessian fly-free dates for different areas of Illinois are shown in Figure Wheat planted on or after the fly-free date is unlikely to be damaged by the Hessian fly, but a more important reason not to plant too early is that aphids that can carry barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) are much more likely to move into early-planted Size: KB.

    Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Hessian fly larvae for up to 30 days. Depending on when the wheat is planted, this may protect plants through the egg-laying period in fall or at least shorten the period of vulnerability before cold weather stops adult emergence and larval either case, Hessian fly .

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat and occurs in most wheat- growing areas of the United States (Fig. 29) and most other production areas of the is thought to be endemic to the southern Caucasus and southwest Asia, the center of origin of the genus Triticum L., and to have dispersed to Europe, North Africa and North America. Click to read more about The Hessians: Journal of the Johannes Schwalm Historical Association (Volume 9). by Johannes Schwalm Historical Association. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site Reviews: 2.


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The hessian fly (Mayetiola (Cecidomyia) destructor Say.) by F. M. Webster Download PDF EPUB FB2

Figure Adult Hessian fly. Figure Hessian fly eggs can resemble early stages of leaf rust. Figure Hessian fly larvae. Figure Full grown Hessian fly larvae or flaxseeds.

It is important, however, to recognize that a portion of the population fail to emerge as adults at any one period. "[T]he destruction of wheat by the Hessian fly is general through the states." November (Jefferson to James Maury).

"[T]he wheat sown for the ensuing year is in a great measure destroyed by the drought & the fly." May 5. (Jefferson to James Monroe). "[T]he Hessian fly appears alarmingly in our growing crops." June   Chen M.S., Liu X.M., Wang H., and El Bouhssini M.

() Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) interactions with barley, rice, and wheat seedlings. Journal of Economic Entomology. (4): Aggarwal R., Bennati T.R, Gill N, Zhao CY, Chen MS, Fellers JP, Schemerhorn BJ, Stuart JJ () A BAC-based physical map of the Hessian fly genome.

HESSIAN FLY The Hessian fly or barley midge, Mayetiola destructor, is a species of fly that is a significant pest of cereal crops including wheat, barley and rye.

Though a native of Asia it was transported into Europe and later into North America, supposedly in the straw bedding of Hessian troops during the American Revolution (–83). Additional Physical Format: Online version: Webster, F. (Francis Marion), Hessian fly. Washington, D.C.: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, High-yielding Hessian-resistant cultivars have been developed that can protect the crop against Hessian fly damage (Ryan et al ).

Grasshoppers, wheat midge, and grain aphids are also periodic pests of durum wheat on the northern Great Plains and Canadian prairies. More details on insect pests and control are found in Chapter 5 of this book.

The Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) is the world’s most important insect pest of wheat. It also belongs to one of the largest families of the Diptera, the gall midges (Cecidomyiidae), which includes a number of other agriculturally important beneficial and pest species.

The genetics of. Hessian fly definition is - a small European dipteran fly (Mayetiola destructor) introduced into North America that is destructive to wheat. The Hessian fly is one of the most destructive insect pests of wheat in the United States.

Severe infestations are sporadic in Nebraska with the greatest damage potential occurring in the eastern half of the state. Although the Hessian fly is injurious chiefly to. Hessian fly ratings are based on results of greenhouse tests with Kansas (Great Plains) biotype of Hessian fly.

Hessian fly populations are often a mixture of biotypes thus results can vary among years and locations. Indicates resistance has been inconsistent in greenhouse testing.

CLEARFIELD ® variety, which is resistant to Beyond. Hessian flies synonyms, Hessian flies pronunciation, Hessian flies translation, English dictionary definition of Hessian flies.

A gall midge having larvae that damage wheat and other grain plants. The Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) is the world’s most important insect pest of wheat.

It also belongs to one of the largest families of the Diptera, the gall midges (Cecidomyiidae), which. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Gallun, R. (Robert L.), Hessian fly. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, [] (OCoLC)   Hessian fly is generally more problematic in the southeast, where it has a longer period of activity and undergoes more generations than in other regions of the United States (BuntinStuart et al.

Various management practices can greatly limit Hessian fly infestations in wheat (RatcliffePorter et al. Destruction of Cited by: 4. Hessian Fly. Collection. Wallach Division Picture Collection.

Insects -- Fly. Dates / Origin Date Issued: Library locations The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Picture Collection Shelf locator: PC INSE-Fly Topics Caterpillars. The hessian fly and how losses from it can be avoided.

One of 1, books in the series: Farmers' bulletin (United of Agriculture) available on this site. available on this by: 5. Download book Download PDF Download All Download JPEG Download Text The Hessian fly, Cecidomyia destructor, in Great Britain in being mainly reports of British observations with illustrations from life and some means of prevention and remedy.

The Hessian fly, Cecidomyia destructor, in Great Britain in being mainly reports of British observations with illustrations from life and some means of prevention and remedy. Ormerod, Eleanor A.

(Eleanor Anne), Type. Book. Material. Published material. Publication info. Insects of Small Grains. Small grains-wheat, oats, barley, and rye-are usually fairly free of severe insect pest problems in New York. Three species have been of concern to farmers in recent years: the armyworm, the cereal leaf beetle, and the Hessian fly.

Infestations of these insects are variable, occurring at irregular intervals or in. This banner text can have markup.

web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Hessian fly, European gall gnat gnat, common name for any one of a number of small, fragile-looking two-winged flies of the suborder Nematocera, order Diptera, which includes the families Tipulidae (crane flies), Bibionidae (hairflies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Chironomidae (true midges), Cecidomyidae.Hessian fly adults emerge in late summer and early fall; the fly-free dates typically occur after peak emergence of the fly.

By planting wheat after the fly-free date, the egg-laying females are not able to find a suitable host, so they die without laying a full complement of eggs. If the Hessian fly female finds wheat that has been planted.The Serphoid and Chalcidoid Parasites of the Hessian Fly A.

B. Gahan US Department of Agriculture, pages. Condition is Good. Pencil marks and library stamps on cover. Maybe slightly different than the one in photo. Shipped with USPS Media Rating: % positive.